Immerse your delegates in Indigenous culture and experiences in Arnhem Land.

Arnhem Land is located in the north-eastern corner of the Northern Territory’s Top End region. It features an untouched and diverse landscape made up of more than 91,000 square kilometres, with a rugged and remote coastline, sandy beaches overlooking the sparkling Arafura Sea, islands, rainforests and towering escarpments, as well as the Garig Gunak National Park.

It is approximately 500 kilometres from Darwin but only 50 minutes by air. Daily flights connect the township of Nhulunbuy with both Darwin and also Cairns in Queensland.

The region is one of Australia’s last strongholds of traditional Aboriginal culture dating back more than 50,000 years. Visiting Arnhem Land requires a permit from the traditional landowners via the

Northern Land Council, which only adds to the exclusivity.  This permit is not required if visiting with an organised excursion operator who already has permission to enter the region.

Wildlife is exotic and abundant and includes the region’s largest predator, the saltwater crocodile, as well as dugong, nesting turtles and hundreds of bird species including jacana, azure kingfishers, magpie geese, brolga and jabiru.

The region is world-renowned for its sport fishing safaris, as well as interactive Aboriginal cultural eco tours. Several renowned Indigenous art centres are located in Arnhem Land and visits can also be arranged to secret ancient Indigenous rock art sites, as well as historic early Victorian settlement ruins.

Boutique-style wilderness lodges are scattered throughout the region and offer deluxe safari-style ensuite cabin accommodation for incentives or exclusive-use small corporate meetings and retreats.

The largest property in Arnhem Land is Groote Eylandt Lodge (formerly Dugong Beach Resort), which is located on the Gulf of Carpentaria and offers 74 guest rooms and bungalows surrounded by bushland and aqua water.  The dedicated small group conference suite divides into two separate venues and is complemented by sophisticated audio-visual.

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